Engineers Canada logo

Areas of Engineering Practice

The "practice of professional engineering" means any act of planning, designing, composing, evaluating, advising, reporting, directing or supervising that requires the application of engineering principles and that concerns the safeguarding of life, health, property, economic interests, the public welfare or the environment, or the managing of any such act. In Canada, a licence is required to practise professional engineering.

Engineering is constantly evolving and new areas of practice are always emerging. This is reflected in provincial and territorial legislation which recognize that a definitive list of types of engineering would quickly become dated. Engineers Canada maintains a searchable list of established and emerging areas of practice.

Emerging areas of practice evolve from other areas of engineering. The following areas of practice of professional engineering have been defined in the past 10 years: 

Area of Practice

Year

Defined by

Architectural conservation and sustainability engineering

2015

Carleton University

Communications infrastructure engineering 

2015

Professional Engineers Ontario

Process engineering

2013

Memorial Newfoundland University

Nanotechnology and molecular engineering

2013

Professional Engineers Ontario

Biomedical and mechanical engineering

2012

Carleton University

Biomedical engineering

2012

Ryerson University

Green process engineering

2012

Western University

Management engineering

2012

University of Waterloo

Sustainable and renewable energy engineering

2012

Carleton University

Mechatronic systems engineering

2011

Simon Fraser University

Biomedical and electrical engineering

2010

Carleton University

Mechanical systems engineering

2010

Conestoga College Institute of Technology and Advanced Learning

Nanotechnology engineering

2010

University of Waterloo

Aeronautical engineering

2009

Royal Military College

Automotive engineering

2009

Ontario Institute of Technology 

Biomedical mechanical engineering

2009

Ottawa University

Biotechnological engineering

2008

University of Sherbrooke

Mechatronics engineering

2008

University of Waterloo

Operations and logistics engineering

2008

École de technologie supérieure

Mineral resources engineering

2007

Dalhousie University

Nuclear engineering

2007

Ontario Institute of Technology

Software systems

2007

Regina University

Space engineering

2007

York University

 

The National Occupational Classification (NOC) provides a standardized language for describing the work performed in the Canadian labour market. It gives statisticians, labour market analysts, career counselors, employers and individual job seekers a consistent way to collect data and describe and understand the nature of work.

EngScape, our online labour marker portal, provides the 14 engineering classifications and over 500 sample job titles that are recognized by the federal government as requiring a licence to practise professional engineering. The list is not a complete list, but provides a useful guide.

Engineers Canada has cross-referenced the National Occupational Codes with Accredited Engineering Programs in Canada.  If an applicant for licensure did not graduate from accredited engineering program, we also provide an Examination Syllabus which is a set of topics used by the provincial and territorial engineering regulatory bodies to check that an applicant’s academic knowledge meets that needed to be licensed in Canada. The curriculum of the accredited program and the element of the exam syllabi provide a framework for determining engineering principles required to practice engineering.

In addition, to ensure public clarity on the use of engineering terms, Engineers Canada owns a portfolio of official marks and trademarks representing its corporate identity, the engineering designations and various projects and initiatives it has undertaken. 

For more information

For more information contact , at