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National Membership Report 2015

The National Membership Report provides national information on the members of the provincial and territorial engineering regulatory bodies on an annual basis in order to provide timely and accurate membership information about the engineering profession in Canada.

Membership in the provincial and territorial regulators grew again in 2014. In total, as of December 31, 2014, there were 277,847 members (excluding students) in the twelve jurisdictions. Of these, 12.2% members were female.  There were 196,152 practising professional engineers, which is a 3.5% increase from last year (189,522). Of these practicing engineers, 17.7% were women (see Sheet 1, below). The number of practising engineers (inclusive)1 was 201,464 (24,143 women) in 2014.

Since 2013, the greatest growth has occurred in Newfoundland and Labrador (7.9%), whereas both Engineers PEI and OIQ lost members, -1.3% and -1.0% respectively.  Over the 2010 to 2014 period, membership grew 15.1% nationally. The greatest gains were again in Newfoundland and Labrador (49.2% increase) and Saskatchewan (41.2% increase). The smallest growth occurred in Quebec and New Brunswick (1.8% and 2.9%, respectively). Female members increased in all jurisdictions from 2013 to 2014. The largest gains were in the Yukon (25.9% increase), British Columbia (12.1% increase) and Newfoundland and Labrador (11.0% increase).

In 2014, the number of engineers per one-thousand people increased or remained the same in every jurisdiction. In Canada, there were 5.5 engineers per 1,000 individuals.  The Yukon has the most number of engineers per one-thousand people at 20.6.

  Engineers2 Persons (thousands)3 P.Eng.’s/1000 People
BC 18,141 4,666.9 3.9
AB 43,898 4,175.4 10.5
SK 7,670 1,134.4 6.8
MB 4,979 1,292.2 3.9
ON 66,285 13,750.1 4.8
QC 42,895 8,245.5 5.2
NB 3,189 753.3 4.2
NS 4,236 942.9 4.5
PEI 266 146.3 1.8
NL 3,580 525.8 6.8
NWT
& NU
254 80.1 3.2
YK 759 36.8 20.6
Total 196,152 35,749.6 5.5

 

In 2015, Engineers Canada released the 30 by 30 goal with the support of each provincial and territorial regulator. This is a commitment to increasing the number of female newly licensed engineers to 30% by 2030. Nationally, 17.0% of newly licensed engineers were women in 2014. The Association of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists of Manitoba (APEGM) had the highest proportion of female newly licensed engineers at 25.4%.  

  Male Newly Licensed P.Eng. Female Newly Licensed P.Eng. Total Newly Licensed P.Eng. Percent Female
BC 582 116 698 16.6%
AB 2,078 465 2,543 18.3%
SK 249 47 296 15.9%
MB 135 46 181 25.4%
ON 2,084 402 2,486 16.2%
QC 1,998 382 2,380 16.1%
NB 90 21 111 18.9%
NS 135 24 159 15.1%
PEI 9 3 12 25.0%
NL 57 10 67 14.9%
NWT
& NU
NR4 NR NR NR
YK 7 1 8 12.5%
Total 7,175 1,470 8,645 17.0%

 

When comparing the number of newly licensed Canadian Engineering Accreditation Board graduates in 2014 (6,045) to the number of Canadian Engineering Accreditation Board graduates in 2010 (11,536 graduates), we see that, nationally, approximately 50% of graduates obtained a license. Although this is an estimation, it is a first attempt to measuring the successful promotion of students to the profession.

[1] Practising engineers (inclusive) includes all categories of practising (i.e. not retired) members reported by the engineering regulators. These are: engineers—exclusive; temporary licence holders; restricted licence holders; and licence to practise holders.
[2] Practising engineers (P.Eng.) only.
[3] Source:  Statistics Canada. Table  051-0005 -  Estimates of population, Canada, provinces and territories, quarterly (persons),  CANSIM (database). (accessed: 2015-07-22)
[4] NR indicates information not reported by the regulator.

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For more information contact us at research@engineerscanada.ca